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CENTENE, NORTH CAROLINA MEDICAL SOCIETY
AND NORTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER ASSOCIATION
AWARDED MEDICAID CONTRACT

Joint Venture to Offer Unique Approach to Medicaid Reform in North Carolina

ST. LOUIS (February 4, 2019) — Centene Corporation (NYSE: CNC) announced today that its North Carolina subsidiary, Carolina Complete Health, has been awarded a contract in North Carolina for the Medicaid Managed Care program. Carolina Complete Health is a joint venture partnership with the North Carolina Medical Society and North Carolina Community Health Center Association to offer a unique approach to Medicaid reform.

Pending regulatory approval, the new three-year contract is effective February 1, 2020 and includes the option to renew for up to two additional years. Under the agreement, Carolina Complete Health will provide Medicaid managed care services in Regions 3 and 5 with a focus on the state’s goals of whole-person care, localized care management and addressing the full set of factors impacting health. A key feature of the joint venture will be the active participation of physicians in the ownership of the health plan and responsible leadership in its governance.
“We are pleased to be selected to work with the state of North Carolina to implement its new Medicaid managed care program,” said Michael F. Neidorff, Chairman and CEO for Centene. “Through our transformative model, Carolina Complete Health will ensure providers are involved in health care decisions, using our advanced systems, and promoting value-based care. Members will have access to the highest quality services and experience better health outcomes at a competitive cost.”

“As the oldest professional society in the state and the largest group representing North Carolina physicians and PAs, we are looking forward to working with our partners to launch Carolina Complete Health, an innovative Medicaid plan serving our most vulnerable citizens,” said North Carolina Medical Society CEO Robert W. Seligson, MBA, MA. “Both Centene Corporation and the NC Community Health Center Association share our core values of patient-focused, physician-led care and working diligently toward achieving better health for all North Carolinians.”

“We’re excited to partner with North Carolina physicians and the industry leading Centene Corporation to develop a patient-centered, provider-directed Medicaid plan,” said E. Benjamin Money, Jr., President and CEO for NCCHCA. “With over 50 years of service to Medicaid beneficiaries in North Carolina, community health centers have the experience and relationships necessary to make our effort a success. Health Centers are governed by the patients that use their services. Having the direct engagement of consumers and providers creates the necessary elements to drive decisions aimed at increasing access, improving quality, and managing costs.”

Centene provides Medicaid managed care programs in 26 states, and is the leader in the four largest Medicaid markets, including California, Florida, New York and Texas.

About Centene Corporation
Centene Corporation, a Fortune 100 company, is a diversified, multi-national healthcare enterprise that provides a portfolio of services to government sponsored and commercial healthcare programs, focusing on under-insured and uninsured individuals. Many receive benefits provided under Medicaid, including the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), as well as Aged, Blind or Disabled (ABD), Foster Care and Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS), in addition to other state-sponsored programs, Medicare (including the Medicare prescription drug benefit commonly known as “Part D”), dual eligible programs and programs with the U.S. Department of Defense. Centene also provides healthcare services to groups and individuals delivered through commercial health plans. Centene operates local health plans and offers a range of health insurance solutions. It also contracts with other healthcare and commercial organizations to provide specialty services including behavioral health management, care management software, correctional healthcare services, dental benefits management, commercial programs, home-based primary care services, life and health management, vision benefits management, pharmacy benefits management, specialty pharmacy and telehealth services.

Centene uses its investor relations website to publish important information about the Company, including information that may be deemed material to investors. Financial and other information about Centene is routinely posted and is accessible on Centene’s investor relations website,  http://www.centene.com/investors.

Forward-Looking Statements
The company and its representatives may from time to time make written and oral forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act (PSLRA) of 1995, including statements in this and other press releases, in presentations, filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), reports to stockholders and in meetings with investors and analysts. In particular, the information provided in this press release may contain certain forward-looking statements with respect to the financial condition, results of operations and business of Centene and certain plans and objectives of Centene with respect thereto, including but not limited to the expected benefits of the acquisition of Health Net, Inc. (Health Net) (Health Net Acquisition) and the acquisition of New York State Catholic Health Plan, Inc., d/b/a Fidelis Care New York (Fidelis Care) (Fidelis Care Acquisition). These forward-looking statements can be identified by the fact that they do not relate only to historical or current facts. Without limiting the foregoing, forward-looking statements often use words such as “believe”, “anticipate”, “plan”,  “expect”, “estimate”, “intend”, “seek”, “target”, “goal”, “may”, “will”, “would”, “could”, “should”, “can”, “continue” and other similar words and expressions (and the negative thereof). We intend such forward-looking statements to be covered by the safe-harbor  provisions for forward-looking statements contained in PSLRA. A number of factors, variables or events could cause actual plans and results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in forward-looking statements. Such factors include, but are not limited to, Centene’s ability to accurately predict and effectively manage health benefits and other operating expenses and reserves; competition; membership and revenue declines or unexpected trends; changes in healthcare practices, new technologies and advances in medicine; increased healthcare costs; changes in economic, political or market conditions; changes in federal or state laws or regulations, including changes with respect to income tax reform or government healthcare programs as well as changes with respect to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Affordability Reconciliation Act and any regulations enacted thereunder that may result from changing political conditions or judicial actions, including the ultimate outcome of the District Court decision in “Texas v. United States of America” regarding the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on Friday, December 14, 2018; rate cuts or other payment reductions or delays by governmental payors and other risks and uncertainties affecting Centene’s government businesses; Centene’s ability to adequately price products on federally facilitated and state-based Health Insurance Marketplaces; tax matters; disasters or major epidemics; the outcome of legal and regulatory proceedings; changes in expected contract start dates; provider, state, federal and other contract changes and timing of regulatory approval of contracts; the expiration, suspension or termination of Centene’s contracts with federal or state governments (including but not limited to Medicaid, Medicare, TRICARE or other customers); the difficulty of predicting the timing or outcome of pending or future litigation or government investigations; challenges to Centene’s contract awards; cyber-attacks or other privacy or data security incidents; the possibility that the expected synergies and value creation from acquired businesses, including, without limitation, the Health Net Acquisition and the Fidelis Care Acquisition, will not be realized, or will not be realized within the expected time period; the exertion of management’s time and Centene’s resources, and other expenses incurred and business changes required in connection with complying with the undertakings in connection with any regulatory, governmental or third party consents or approvals for the Health Net Acquisition or the Fidelis Care Acquisition; disruption caused by significant completed and pending acquisitions, including the Health Net Acquisition and the Fidelis Care Acquisition, making it more difficult to maintain business and operational relationships; the risk that unexpected costs will be incurred in connection with the completion and/or integration of acquisition transactions, including among others, the Health Net Acquisition and the Fidelis Care Acquisition; changes in expected closing dates, estimated purchase  price and accretion for acquisitions; the risk that acquired businesses, including Health Net and Fidelis Care, will not be integrated successfully; the risk that, following the FidelisCare Acquisition, Centene may not be able to effectively manage its expanded operations; restrictions and limitations in connection with Centene’s indebtedness; Centene’s ability to achieve improvement in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Star ratings and maintain or achieve improvement in other quality scores in each case that can impact revenue and future growth; availability of debt and equity financing, on terms that are favorable to Centene; inflation; foreign currency fluctuations; the stock split and the required stockholders approval to increase Centene’s authorized common stock; and risks and uncertainties discussed in the reports that Centene has filed with the SEC. These forward-looking statements reflect Centene’s current views with respect to future events and are based on numerous assumptions and assessments made by Centene in light of its experience and perception of historical trends, current conditions, business strategies, operating environments, future developments and other factors it believes appropriate. By their nature, forwardlooking statements involve known and unknown risks and uncertainties and are subject to change because they relate to events and depend on circumstances that will occur in the future. The factors described in the context of such forward-looking statements in this press release could cause Centene’s plans with respect to the Health Net Acquisition, the Fidelis Care Acquisition, actual results, performance or achievements, industry results and developments to differ materially from those expressed in or implied by such forward-looking statements. Although it is currently believed that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, no assurance can be given that such expectations will prove to have been correct and persons reading this press release are therefore cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements which speak only as of the date of this press release. Centene does not assume any obligation to update the information contained in this press release (whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise), except as required by applicable law. This list of important factors is not intended to be exhaustive. We discuss certain of these matters more fully, as well as certain other risk factors that may affect Centene’s business operations, financial condition and results of operations, in Centene’s filings with the SEC, including the annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and current reports on Form 8-K.

On February 4th, the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) announced Standard Plan awardees for the state’s Medicaid transition.

Statewide Awarded Prepaid Health Plans include:

One Regional Awarded Provider-Led Entity:

NC DHHS also announced regions 2 and 4 will be in phase 1 of rollout which will begin November 1, 2019. The remaining regions will be rolled out February 3, 2020.
NC FQHCs are considered essential providers and are expected to be offered good-faith contracts with all plans.

On Friday, December 14, a Federal judge in Texas ruled that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) should be struck down as unconstitutional after its individual mandate penalty was zeroed out last year as part of the Tax Reform bill. You can read more about the ruling here. Consumers and health care providers should keep the following in mind.

The ACA is still the law, and nothing has changed. The ruling will be appealed.

All provisions of the ACA currently remain in place. The ruling has no impact on current Marketplace coverage and will not impact coverage in 2019 plans. Consumers should continue to pay their monthly premiums and use their health insurance. Consumers can continue to rely on their local community health centers for enrollment help. The recent ruling will be appealed and is expected to work its way to the Supreme Court—a process that could take many months.

Insurance Coverage has increased in NC since passage of the ACA

Even though North Carolina did not expand Medicaid under the ACA, insurance coverage rates in the state have increased since implementation of the health care law.  In 2017, 11% of the NC population was uninsured, down from 16% in 2013.The ACA has positively impacted patients by protecting those with pre-existing conditions and allowing children to stay on their parents’ insurance plan until age 26.

North Carolina Still Has a Coverage Gap

Though North Carolina’s economy is growing, that growth is across many sectors including low-wage service jobs and those in the gig economy. Many people in these jobs do not have coverage through their employers. North Carolina should offer its residents, affordable, reliable access to regular primary and preventive care (as well as access to specialists and other needed services), so that we can keep the economy growing sustainably.

Access to Health Care is Necessary to Curbing the Opioid Epidemic & Addressing Behavioral Health Problems

Effective treatment solutions for opioid require a holistic approach.  Having health insurance coverage for medical and behavioral health care is essential to treatment success and avoidance of relapse. Behavioral health challenges may result in barriers to employment, sustaining a healthy family, and keeping one’s home. Maintaining ongoing access to behavioral health services are important for many people with significant behavioral health struggles.

The North Carolina Community Health Center Association (NCCHCA) is the state’s Primary Care Association. Formed in 1978 by the leadership of community health centers, NCCHCA is comprised of membership from each of the 41 health center grantees, aspiring health centers and other partners. Board membership is open to all Federally Qualified Health Center Grantees and Look-alikes. These health center grantees and Look-alikes operate over 220 clinical sites and served over 560,000 patients in 2017.

Last Wednesday, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced approval of North Carolina’s 1115 Waiver, which requested modifications to the way our state runs its Medicaid program. The approval gives NC the authority to implement a Medicaid managed care program according to the timeline and structure proposed by the NC Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).

Key Aspects of the NC Medicaid Waiver Program include:

  1. Behavioral Health Integration: Mild to moderate behavioral health services will be available through Standard Plans. Individuals needing more intensive BH services shall elect Tailored plans which launch in year 2 of managed care. There will be a specialized behavioral health home model for beneficiaries with complex needs and seamless coordination with physical health care services.
  2. Opioid Strategy: The program intends to Increase access to inpatient and residential services for individuals struggling with opioid and substance use addiction.
  3. Healthy Opportunities Pilot: The program will include a pilot focused on improving health and reducing health care costs in 2-4 regions of the state that will address some/all of five priority areas impacting health: unstable housing, food insecurity, transportation issues, employment challenges and interpersonal safety.

Aspects of the 1115 Waiver that were NOT approved:

This blog post from CMS Administrator Seema Verma outlines the NC Medicaid 1115 Waiver and its innovations.

For Immediate Release.
Contact Peter Freeman
freemanp@ncchca.org
919-655-0393

Raleigh: Carolina Medical Home Network (CMHN) saved Medicare $3.1 million dollars in 2017 by implementing value-based care strategies to control cost and utilization.  Recently released CMS Accountable Care Organization (ACO) results show that CMHN has been on an upward trajectory on controlling cost since their inception in 2015.  Our ACO health centers spent 16% less per patient per year than the National Fee-for-Service peer group and outperformed the All Medicare Shared Savings ACO peer group.

In 2015, the NC Community Health Care Association created an Accountable Care Organization (ACO) under the umbrella of Carolina Medical Home Network (CMHN).   In 2017 the CMHN ACO was comprised of eight health centers: Advance CHC, Caswell Family Medical Center, Gaston Family Health Services, Goshen Medical Center, Hot Springs Health Program, Piedmont Health Services, Roanoke-Chowan CHC, and Rural Health Group.  The ACO is in a Medicare Shared Savings (MSSP) Track 1 model, which is a no-risk model that allows for potential shared savings of up to 50% after surpassing a minimum savings threshold.

Contact: Ben Money, CEO
(919) 469-5701
North Carolina Community Health Center Association
4917 Waters Edge Drive, Suite 165
Raleigh, North Carolina 27606

On October 10th, 2018, the Trump Administration posted a proposed rule that would broaden the definition of “public charge”—a designation used to determine whether an immigrant applying for legal permanent residence status or admission to the United States should be granted that status.  The expanded public charge proposal is cause for profound concern among Community Health Centers (CHCs) and the 28 million patients they serve. The North Carolina Community Health Center Association fears the proposal will impose additional barriers – real and perceived – to services immigrant families need to maintain their health and the public health and well-being of the communities in which they reside.

Many patients served by health centers work in service sector jobs requiring close interaction with others.  Imposing barriers and disincentives for this population to seek preventive and primary health care services would have a negative impact on local businesses and economies and could make it more difficult to control communicable disease outbreaks. Since women make up 80 percent of all single-parent households, women are at an increased risk of being determined a ‘public charge’ based on their household size. Children are at an increased risk of being determined a public charge due to their age and greater likelihood of accessing receipt of public benefits such as Medicaid and food stamps.  Children would be at additional risk if CHIP was added to the list of services that make someone a public charge; therefore The North Carolina Community Health Center Association also asks that participation in the Children’s Health Insurance Program not be considered in the determination of public charge.

The Community Health Center mission is to provide cost effective, quality health care in areas where economic, geographic, or cultural barriers limit access to affordable health care services. We recognize the importance of population health and the role that access to affordable health care plays in maintaining and improving the health of communities, as well as empowering individuals to engage in employment and strengthen our state’s economy. This rule, if enacted as written, would likely prevent individuals from accessing services that are important for their health and well-being as well as that of the community of which they are a part. Expansion of the public charge rule is expected to decreased participation in Medicaid, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, the Medicare Part D Low-Income Subsidy Program, and housing programs. Such reductions would contribute to more uninsured individuals, less control of communicable diseases, and negatively affect the health and financial stability of communities.

This proposed rule works against our efforts to improve the health and economic well-being of everyone in North Carolina. We ask that the Administration reconsider this effort immediately and work with us to maintain access to preventive and primary care services for Community Health Center patients their communities.

Federal Funding to Support Health Center Substance Use Disorder and Mental Health Services Comes Right on Time in North Carolina

Raleigh, NC — Today, US Health and Human Services (HHS) Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) announced more than $10 million in federal funding to expand access to quality substance use disorder and mental health services at 36 Community Health Centers across North Carolina. This funding is being awarded at a crucial time for North Carolina – many health centers are responding to Hurricane Florence’s damage while caring for patients and beginning the difficult task of repairing the damage and recovering from losses. A report from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, also published today, describes how health centers in Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands experienced an increase in the number of patients suffering mental health problems, stress-related conditions and poorly managed chronic health conditions following Hurricanes Maria and Irma in 2017.

This new substance abuse disorder and mental health funding award will help Community Health Centers respond to the opioid epidemic which is damaging the lives of many North Carolinians. Ben Money, CEO of the North Carolina Community Health Center Association, which provides training and technical assistance to Community Health Centers in the state noted, “We are grateful to Congress and HRSA for making this funding available to Community Health Centers. Health centers are critical to addressing North Carolina’s substance abuse and mental health problem. They are governed by the consumers who use their services, providing them with a unique perspective on local needs. Health centers are front-line providers, often the first place a person with a behavioral health need identifies their problem and seeks care. Because community health centers provide services to anyone regardless of their ability to pay, they are well positioned to meet immediate physical and behavioral health needs, and support individuals along their path to recovery.”

In addition to the expanded access funding, HHS also announced the Fiscal Year 2018 Federal Office of Rural Health Policy Awards today. Two Community Health Centers, Appalachian Mountain Community Health Centers (Asheville, NC) and Metropolitan Community Health (Washington, NC), will each receive $200,000 to increase access to substance abuse prevention and treatment services for their rural communities.

Fiscal Year 2018 Federal Office of Rural Health Policy Awards

iscal Year 2018 Expanding Access to Quality Substance Use Disorder and Mental Health Services (SUD-MH) Awards

Total award: $10,146,569 to support 36 North Carolina Health Centers

About the North Carolina Community Health Association 
The North Carolina Community Health Center Association serves as the collective voice for North Carolina’s 41 Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and Look-alikes (LAs)—aka Community Health Centers (CHCs). Our members offer a patient-governed, patient-centered health care home that integrates high quality medical, dental, behavioral health, pharmacy, and enabling services without regard to a person’s ability to pay. CHCs are geographically dispersed across 85 counties and operate more than 240 clinical sites. In 2017, CHCs served more than 550,000 people across North Carolina with 43% of those patients being uninsured.

North Carolina Community Health Center Association Calls on Elected Officials to Develop Health Insurance Coverage for North Carolina’s Uninsured

Contact 
E. Benjamin Money, Jr. MPH
President & CEO
(919) 469-1116 (direct)
(919) 469-5701 (office)

Currently, North Carolina community health centers serve approximately 200,000 uninsured patients statewide with primary care services. Many people who are uninsured show up to our clinics with conditions that have grown worse over time due to a lack of insurance. The vast majority of these people are the working poor that make too little to afford the cost of health insurance premiums, and make too much for Medicaid. They are caught in the “coverage gap.”

Closing the Coverage Gap is Good for a Growing Economy
Though North Carolina’s economy is growing, that growth is across many sectors including low-wage service jobs and those in the gig economy. Many people in these jobs do not have coverage through their employers. North Carolina should offer its residents, new and old, affordable, reliable access to regular primary and preventive care (as well as access to specialists and other needed services), so that we can keep the economy growing sustainably.

Access to Health Care is Necessary to Curbing the Opioid Epidemic & Addressing Behavioral Health Problems

Effective treatment solutions for opioid require a holistic approach. Having health insurance coverage for medical and behavioral health care is essential to treatment success and avoidance of relapse. Behavioral health challenges may result in barriers to employment, sustaining a healthy family, and keeping one’s home. Maintaining ongoing access to behavioral health services are important for many people with significant behavioral health struggles.

Medicaid Expansion Has Been Cost Effective for Other States
In a May 1 Op-Ed in the Raleigh News & Observer, Wake Forest School of Law Professor Mark Hall writes: “The strong balance of objective evidence indicates that actual costs to states so far from expanding Medicaid are negligible or minor, and that states across the political spectrum do not regret their decisions to expand Medicaid.”

NCCHCA Has Supported Prior Efforts to Close the Gap
Last year, NCCHCA endorsed HB 662, Carolina Cares, a conservative approach to covering the uninsured. This bill, introduced by Representatives Lambeth, Murphy, Dobson, and White sought to empower patients to access affordable, high quality, and innovative primary and preventive care.
Though we prefer a solution that does not require work requirements, we support it because it:
• Would allow 300,000+ working people in the coverage gap to gain affordable coverage.
• Empowers patients by encouraging participation in preventive care and wellness programs.
• Would not cost the state anything, as it will receive funding through (a) federal match, (b) participant contributions, and (c) state assessments, including hospital assessment.
NCCHCA will continue to support bipartisan solutions to close North Carolina’s coverage gap and help us maintain a healthy workforce and support a growing economy.

About Community Health Centers and NCCHCA
Community Health Centers are community-based and patient-directed organizations that deliver comprehensive, culturally competent, high-quality primary health care services. Health centers also integrate access to pharmacy, mental health, substance abuse, and oral health services in areas where economic, geographic, or cultural barriers limit access to affordable health care services. Health centers deliver care to the Nation’s most vulnerable individuals and families, including people experiencing homelessness, agricultural workers, residents of public housing, and the Nation’s veterans.

The North Carolina Community Health Center Association (NCCHCA) is the state’s Primary Care Association. Formed in 1978 by the leadership of community health centers, NCCHCA is comprised of membership from each of the 40 health center grantees, aspiring health centers and other partners. Board membership is open to all Federally Qualified Health Center Grantees and Look-alikes. These health center grantees and Look-alikes operate over 220 clinical sites and served over 500,000 patients in 2016.

 

For a PDF version of this press release, click here. 

On March 22, 2018, Congress passed an Omnibus fiscal year 2018 spending bill that funds the government through September 30, 2018. This included a new budget for the US Department of Health and Humans Services. Included in that budget were several items important to community health center patients, most importantly CHC discretionary funding, which accounts for 30% of all CHC federal funding.

In the new budget, Community Health Centers received $1.626 billion in discretionary funding. When added to the mandatory funding that Community Health Centers received in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, CHCs will have a total of $5.4 billion in 2018 federal funding. The bulk of the funding will be used to continue ongoing base grants and fund health center operations.

Some of the money has specific goals: 200 million of Section 330 grant dollars will be directed to quality improvement or service expansion grants to support behavioral health, mental health or substance use disorder services. $20 million will be used to replenish the Health Center Loan Guarantee Program, and $105 million will go to the National Health Services Corps (NHSC) program to expand delivery of substance use disorder treatment services. When added to earlier funding from the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, NHSC will have a total of $415 million in federal funding for FY18. The latest legislation also expands NHSC loan repayment eligibility to substance use disorder counselors.

North Carolina Community Health Centers served more than 520,000 patients in 2016. There are now 42 CHCs operating in North Carolina, with over 220 CHC sites located in 85 counties and serving patients from all areas of the state. Community Health Centers are governed by the patients that use their services and excel at empowering patients to take personal responsibility for improving their own health outcomes. They provide services including primary medical care, dental, pharmacy and behavioral health services. Wrap-around services are used to address patient needs that go beyond the provider visit. Serving on the front lines in the fight against the opioid abuse epidemic and childhood obesity, CHCs operate as the only comprehensive providers of healthcare in many rural areas of our state. Community Health Centers accept Medicaid, Medicare, and commercial insurance, but also offer sliding fees to assure that care is accessible to low-income and uninsured persons.

After 130 days of funding uncertainty, North Carolina Community Health Centers are grateful to Congress for reauthorizing CHC funding through September 30, 2019. Without this funding, health centers faced a 70% cut in mandatory federal funding eliminating care for over a quarter million North Carolinians.

The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, which passed on February 9, 2018, included $7.8 billion dollars in federal grant funding for the Community Health Center program. The continued funding will maintain access to integral services provided to 27 million patients at 1400 community health centers across the nation. NC CHCs are also thankful for protection of the National Health Service Corps, a loan repayment program that is vital to our ability to recruit and retain providers in North Carolina’s rural and medically underserved areas.

North Carolina Community Health Centers served more than 500,000 patients in 2016. There are now 42 CHCs operating in North Carolina, with well over 220 CHC sites located in 85 counties and serving patients from all areas of the state.

With funding restored for FY18 and FY19, these small businesses providing healthcare around the state can continue doing what successful businesses do: improve services, expand in areas of need, and hire the best people for the community-based, sustainable, and life-saving jobs at Community Health Centers.

Community Health Centers excel at empowering patients to take personal responsibility for improving their own health outcomes. They provide comprehensive access to primary care, and offer integrated dental, pharmacy and mental health services. Wrap-around services are used to address patient needs that go beyond the provider visit. Serving on the front lines in the fight against the opioid abuse epidemic and childhood obesity, CHCs operate as the only comprehensive providers of healthcare in many rural areas of our state.

Marketplace Open Enrollment Starts Nov. 1

Speak with an enrollment assister to explore your health insurance options!

¡Hable con un asistente de inscripción para explorar sus opciones de seguro médico!

 

 

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